2020-2021 Academic Catalog

Biology (BIO)

BIO 100  Biological Science  (3 Credits)  

Study of the general principles and problems of biology, with special emphasis on the human organism, including anatomy, physiology, growth, reproduction, and inheritance. The evolution and diversity among living things are discussed from an ecological perspective.

BIO 100H  Honors Biological Science  (3 Credits)  

Study of the general principles and problems of biology, with special emphasis on the human organism, including anatomy, physiology, growth, reproduction, and inheritance. The evolution and diversity among living things are discussed from an ecological perspective.

BIO 100L  Biological Science Lab  (1 Credits)  

Practical approach to understanding the nature of science. The exercises on cells, tissues, and organ systems are designed to help students understand the human systems.

BIO 105  Human Biology  (3 Credits)  

Survey of the structure and function of the human body and the human life cycle with particular focus on reproduction, growth, and development.

BIO 105L  Human Biology  (1 Credits)  

Laboratory includes dissection of preserved animals/structures, models and microscopic observations, slide/videotapes, computer-simulated dissections and experiments, and hands-on experiments.

BIO 110  General Biology  (3 Credits)  

Survey of basic concepts and principles with emphasis at the molecular and cellular levelsof biological systems. Includes contemporary genetics, metabolism, and organ systems of representative plants and animals.

BIO 110H  Honors General Biology  (3 Credits)  

Survey of basic concepts and principles with emphasis at the molecular and cellular levelsof biological systems. Includes contemporary genetics, metabolism, and organ systems of representative plants and animals.

BIO 110L  General Biology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Survey of basic concepts and principles with emphasis at the molecular and cellular levels of biological systems. Includes contemporary genetics, metabolism, and organ systems of representative plants and animals.

BIO 111  General Biology II  (3 Credits)  

The course is a comprehensive survey of basic biological concepts and principles with emphasis at the organismal level of biological systems. While kingdom organisms are included, plant/animal structure and function, human anatomy/physiology (human organ systems), and ecosystems are also emphasized.

BIO 111L  General Biology II Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

The second part of an introductory laboratory course for science majors designed as a hands-on study of the organismal level of biological systems. Experimental topics in the course include the structure and function of prokaryotes, plants, and animals. The scientific method is emphasized as students collect, analyze, and discuss data relevance to each topic.

BIO 160L  Gen Zoology Lab  (1 Credits)  

Biological concepts of animal life, including, morphology, taxonomy, life histories, reproduction, and distribution.

BIO 161  General Botany  (3 Credits)  

Introductory study of the basic principles of , botany, including comparative studies on , morphology, physiology, genetics,, ecology, and economic uses of major plants.

BIO 163  Microbiology for the Health Sciences  (3 Credits)  

General survey of microorganisms that cause human diseases. The mechanisms of body defense and immunity to infectious agents are discussed.

BIO 163L  Microbiology for the Health Sciences Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Study of culture methods, microscopic sterilization, and aseptic techniques.

BIO 165  Human Anatomy and Physiology  (3 Credits)  

One-year course consisting of an integrated study of the structure and function of the human body; BIO 165 is a lecture series on cells through the four major tissues.

BIO 165L  Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Emphasis on teaching aids such as computed managed instructions and hands-on experience with animal tissues.

BIO 166  Human Anatomy and Physiology  (3 Credits)  

One-year course consisting of an integrated study of the structure and function of the human body; BIO 166 presents lecture topics on the structure and function of organs and organ systems. (Must be taken in sequence with BIO 165).

BIO 166L  Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Emphasis on teaching aids such as computed managed instructions and hands-on experience with animal tissues.

BIO 253  Human Physiology  (3 Credits)  

Survey of the integration of functions, in the human body, noting their structural , relationships

BIO 260  Integrative Zoology  (3 Credits)  

Biological concepts of animal life, including morphology, taxonomy, life histories, reproduction and distribution.

BIO 260L  Integrative Zoology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Biological concepts of animal life, including morphology, taxonomy, life histories, reproduction and distribution.

BIO 261  General Botany  (3 Credits)  

Introductory study of the basic principles of botany, including comparative studies on morphology, physiology, genetics, ecology, and economic uses of major plants.

BIO 261L  General Botany Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Introductory study of the basic principles of botany, including comparative studies on morphology, physiology, genetics, ecology, and economic uses of major plants.

BIO 263  Vertebrate Embryology  (3 Credits)  

Study of the mechanics of development, including the origin of gametes, fertilization, organogenesis, and morphogenesis of early development of the frog, chick, pig, and man.

BIO 263L  Vertebrate Embryology Lab  (1 Credits)  

Laboratory study of the mechanics of development including the origin of gametes, fertilization organogenesis, and morphogenesis of early development of the frog, chick, pig, and man.

BIO 270  Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology  (3 Credits)  

Study of the classification, morphology, and anatomy of vertebrates, including the functions of their organs and organ systems.

BIO 270L  Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Study of the classification, morphology, and anatomy of vertebrates, including the functions of their organs and organ systems.

BIO 271  Ecology  (3 Credits)  

Composition and distribution of biotic communities emphasizing interrelationships of organisms and their physical environment with application to current environmental problems.

BIO 271H  Honors Ecology  (3 Credits)  

Composition and distribution of biotic communities emphasizing interrelationships of organisms and their physical environment with application to current environmental problems.

BIO 271L  Ecology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Composition and distribution of biotic communities emphasizing interrelationships of organisms and their physical environment with application to current environmental problems.

BIO 272  Human Anatomy  (3 Credits)  

Study of the basic structure of organs and organ systems of the body.

BIO 272L  Human Anatomy Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Study of the basic structure of organs and organ systems of the body.

BIO 274  Plant Morphology  (3 Credits)  

Comparative survey of typical representatives of, the plant kingdom with description of form, and structure, reproductive processes (normal life, cycles), and phylogenetic relationships, , of the principal plant groups.

BIO 274L  Plant Morphol Lab  (1 Credits)  

Laboratory focuses on comparative surveys, of typical representatives of the plant kingdom, with description of form and structure, , reproductive processes (normal life cycles), , and phylogenetic relationships of the principal , plant groups

BIO 278  Cell Biology  (3 Credits)  

Study of intracellular mechanisms and the influence of such processes on the cell and its extracellular environment.

BIO 278L  Cell Biology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Study of intracellular mechanisms and the influence of such processes on the cell and its extracellular environment.

BIO 310  General Microbiology  (3 Credits)  

Introduction to the microbes, including bacteria, molds, yeasts, and viruses. Investigation of fundamental concepts of microorganisms, including nutrition, ecology, and physiology; principlesof sterilization and methods of control of microorganisms; their economic importance.

BIO 310L  General Microbiology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Introduction to the microbes, including bacteria, molds, yeasts, and viruses. Investigation of fundamental concepts of microorganisms, including nutrition, ecology, and physiology; principlesof sterilization and methods of control of microorganisms; their economic importance.

BIO 320  Pathophysiology  (3 Credits)  

Introduction to the study of the normal physiology of various systems of the human body and how alterations in structure and function can initiate the onset of disease. Inherent in this course is a studyof the adaptive capacity of the human body.

BIO 350  Parasitology  (3 Credits)  

Study of symbiotic relationships between representatives that are dependent upon asymbiont and the clinical and pathological implications inherent in such a relationship.

BIO 350L  Parasitology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Inquiry-based application of the clinical and pathological implications of inherent relationships established between symbionts.

BIO 351  Principles of Genetics  (3 Credits)  

Introductory course dealing with the principles of heredity and variation in plants and animals, including man.

BIO 351H  Principls Genetics - Honors  (3 Credits)  

Introductory course dealing with the principles, of heredity and variation in plants and animals, , including man

BIO 351L  Principles of Genetics Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Introductory genetic labs are designed to provide exercises that deal with the principles of heredity and variation in plants and animals, including man.

BIO 362  Histology and Microtechnique  (3 Credits)  

Study of the structure and properties of cells the cellular relationships to the main type of tissues and histology of organs; the principles and methods of preparation of plant and animal tissues; and some techniques in histochemistry.

BIO 362L  Histology & Microtechnique Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Study of the structure and properties of cells; the cellular relationships to the main type of tissues and histology of organs; the principles and methods of preparation of plant and animal tissues; and some techniques in histochemistry.

BIO 364  Seminar and Colloquium in Biology  (1 Credits)  

Consideration of current research and development in biology, including reviews, reports, and discussions of investigations reported in scientific journals.

BIO 400  Forensic Molecular Biology  (3 Credits)  

Designed to provide students with the scientific, background and hands-on experience on the molecula, aspects of DNA forensics. Protocols, and procedures currently used in DNA , forensic tests will be performed, , including DNA isolation from various sample, sources, gel electrophoresis, PCR, STR, analysis, and data interpretation. , Relevant scientific journals will be consulted and, articles discussed.

BIO 400L  Forensic Molecular Biology LB  (1 Credits)  

Experiment of DNA forensic tests on current , protocols and procedures, including DNA isolation, various sample sources, gel electroresis, PCR, STR, analysis and data interpretation

BIO 452  Biological Instrumental Techniques  (2 Credits)  

Training and practice in various bio instrumental , techniques, including statistical analysis of , data, respirometry, photo microscopy,, spectrophotometry, chromatography,, electrophoresis, and physiological measurements.

BIO 459  General Physiology  (3 Credits)  

Discusses fundamental principles and properties of physiological processes common to animals.

BIO 459L  General Physiology Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Demonstrates fundamental principles and properties of physiological processes common to animals.

BIO 461  Plant Physiology  (4 Credits)  

Consideration of the physicochemical factors involved in plant growth with special emphasis on synthesis, water economy, transpiration, energy transfers, mineral nutrition, regulation, and the red, far-red reactions of phytochrome of seed plants.

BIO 461L  Plant Physiology Laboratory  (0 Credits)  

Consideration of the physicochemical factors involved in plant growth with special emphasis on synthesis, water economy, transpiration, energy transfers, mineral nutrition, regulation, and the red, far-red reactions of phytochrome of seed plants.

BIO 469  Biochemistry  (3 Credits)  

Biochemical analysis of cellular function and consideration of the implications of the properties of cells, including the cell and its organization, protein structure and specificity; biochemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids; regulation of cell metabolism; cellular basis of hormonecation; and biochemical aspects of synthesis.

BIO 469L  Biochemistry Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

Designed to analyze biochemical properties of protein structure and specificity; biochemistryof lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids; regulation of cell metabolism; cellular basis of hormonecation; and biochemical aspects of synthesis.

BIO 474  Molecular Biology  (3 Credits)  

Introduction to the basic techniques in Recombiant DNA which encompasses the principles and practical aspects of molecular techniques through discussions, demonstrations, and hands on experience, covering isolation of DNA restriction of endonuclease digestion, gel-electrophoresis, transformation of competent cells nick translation, southern and northern blots and DNA sequencing.

BIO 474L  Molecular Biology Laboratory  (2 Credits)  

Introduction to the basic techniques in Recombinant DNA which encompasses the principles and practical aspects of molecular techniques through discussions, demonstrations, and hands-on experience, covering isolation of DNA, restriction of endonuclease digestion, gel-electrophoresis, nick translation, southern and northern blots, and DNA sequencing.

BIO 482  Epidemiology  (3 Credits)  

Basic principles and methods of epidemiology, and the application to communicable and non-, communicable diseases, community health, and , health services research. Reviews oberservational, and experienmental study design; methods and data, analysis; and various indices of assessing , morbidity, mortality and population dynamics

BIO 484  Cytogenetics  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed to provide students with , hands on experience in standard cytogenetics, and molecular cytogenetics. Laboratory exercises , will include cell preparations for cytological , analysis, sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal , preparations for Karyotypic analysis using , standard binding techniques.

BIO 485  Immunology  (3 Credits)  

General properties of immune responses; cells and tissues of immune system; lymphocyte activation and specificity; effector mechanisms; immunity to microbes; immunodeficiency and aids; autoimmune diseases; transplantation.

BIO 492  Genetic Toxicology  (4 Credits)  

General principles of toxicology as they relate, to adverse genetic effects of environmental agents, Basic mechanism of action, including the molecular, and chemical basis for mutagenic effects. , Techniques for the detection and characterization, of chmical mutagen will be included in the , laboratory demonstrations.

BIO 495  Biostatistics  (3 Credits)  

Introduction to statistical methods of health sciences. The principles underlying basic methods of statistical analysis are examined, including elementary concepts of probability, descriptive statistics, and statistical estimation and testing. Special emphasis on the problems of interpreting data from experienmental and observation studies.

BIO 496  Spe Prob in Toxic  (4 Credits)  

Discussion and practical work sessions concerning, the development of ideas and activities for , specific experienmental studies. The specific, features include conversance with current , methodology, initiation of independent and , original protocols as a toxicological tool.

BIO 497  Introduction to Research  (2 Credits)  

Introduction to independent experimental work under the guidance of staff members. Provisions for Honors and undergraduate research participation projects and investigations.

BIO 499  Tissue and Cell Culture  (4 Credits)  

Study of the basic protocols currently employed in the initiation and maintenance of cell lines for in vitro studies, including cell structure, cell types and tissues, behavior of cells in culture, and environmental factors that modulate cell growth.